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Five of Tito's manuscripts have not yet been published. This is in part because there were a few years during which he was not getting published, and in part because he is so prolific his publisher can not keep up with him. Titles of his not- yet-published works are William's House, The Smut Book, Morning Crafts, That Which Ends in Silence and, still in progress, The Node.

William's House

Perdue WILLIAM PEFLEY, the iron-willed protagonist of this eponymous saga, emerges from the sand fields of southernmost Alabama in 1888 and, after infiltrating himself into the graces of Butler County, proceeds step by laborious step to single out the appropriate wife, to marry, and to produce four head of robust sons whose multifarious adventures form the substance of the last 1,500 pages of this 2,000 page novel. He has meanwhile, William has, built the second-most impressive home in town, has established himself as the county's preeminent brick manufacturer, and has had himself elected to the Town Council.

But it is the final of his children, Albert, or "Young Albert," who attends college and, after earning an engineering degree, runs off to South America to take a position with a copper mining company. While there, he makes love to the daughter of one of the local aristocrats, explores the Andes on horseback, gambles at poker with mixed success and then, opting against marriage, returns home to Alabama in time to witness the impending economic depression and the dissolution of the old-style family his father had labored so hard to build.

Read an excerpt here.
The Smut Book

He might be only eleven years old, but that has never forestalled precocious boys from falling in love, falling in love with love, loving rumors of love and loving love's music. That's how it was in 1950, America's most unspoiled year. And yet, looking back upon it from later on, he was to blame himself most vehemently for not having done even more of the above than in fact he did!
That Which Ends in Silence

Although the most decadent city in America hasn't yet been selected, there can be no question about the South and its particular candidate. Having journeyed to that town for reasons that in his opinion were more or less plausible, the book's protagonist invests two full days in diagnosing the symptoms (shown here in pronounced form) of a civilization that has pretty well run its course. Stunned with what he has seen, he leaps on board a bus and runs straight home, only to find…


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